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New Member
dearjohn012
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎05-31-2009

120 Hz? 600 Hz?

 

So, People who bought 120Hz, 240Hz 600Hz Plasma TV.

 

How do you view in higher Hz?

 

It seems like HD Cable TV is still set at 60Hz.

 

 

 

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Trusted Member
MagnoliaPro
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎03-01-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

Well the Hz is supposed to be a measure of the refresh rate of the screen. With LCD's you can adjust how much of the enhanced motion is actually seen and to what degree. Samsung have a setting that is called the auto motion plus, and you adjust it depending on your preference.

 

The plasmas that now say 600Hz there is no way to adjust motion viewing on them, besides plasmas never have had an issue with motion. And your cable box probably says that because it is the signal it is sending out, so changing settings on your TV isn't going to change what the cable box is capable of doing.

 

I hope this answers some of the question about it.

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New Member
dearjohn012
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎05-31-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

 

So, what's the idea when they say "600Hz Subfield Motion Technology"?

 

Little sucks that i can only view in 60Hz.

 

 

So, does 600Hz Subfield Motion Technology automatically adjust up to 120 Hz?

What are some contents that I can see some improvement?

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Trusted Contributor
Entropy
Posts: 3,445
Registered: ‎01-15-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

600 Hz = marketing mumbojumbo made to make the TV look better than other manufacturers when in reality it isn't.

 

The only possible benefit of a 600 Hz refresh rate is to perform temporal dithering - Getting greater bit depth (color accuracy) by rapidly moving a pixel between two brightness values, the eye would see the average of these values.

 

Whether a 600 Hz plasma actually has this benefit, I do not know.

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*disclaimer* I am not now, nor have I ever been, an employee of Best Buy, Geek Squad, nor of any of their affiliate, parent, or subsidiary companies.
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New Member
dearjohn012
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎05-31-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

Correct me if I am wrong.

The Plasma TV never had motion blur problems like the LCD TV.
So, The Plasma TV doesn’t need the 120Hz-240Hz to improve the motion blur.

600Hz only improves the color during the fast moving motion action.


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Trusted Contributor
SlimJim77
Posts: 3,377
Registered: ‎11-23-2008

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

All this Hertz madness has me laughing.

 

My 720P 60hz Pioneer plasma still gives me chills. :manvery-happy:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Disclosure: Former BBY employee.
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Trusted Member
Detachable_Dave
Posts: 85
Registered: ‎07-10-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

not exactly... although 120hz is marketed as anti-motion blur, it really is more of an "anti-choppy" feature- the biggest benefit is in blu ray movies. blu ray is typically shot at 24fps, however many times it loses some of those frames and sends a picture at, say 20 frames- 20 frames is choppy, so what 120hz does is puts in additial frames for a smoother picture. something that solved this some time ago is the feature 24p on most blu ray players, this just ensures you actually are getting 24fps. since lcd has advertized 120 and 240hz, to combat them plasma companies joined them in "the number game"- 480 and 600hz is total bs.
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New Member
micsnedeker
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-18-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

While it's true Marketing has something to do with it (most people automatically assume the higher the Hz the better the motion artifacting), it isn't complete BS.  It is not the same as the Hz rating on an LCD.  Plasmas such as Panasonic are divided into 10 subfields, each subfield receiving a 60hz processing.  10x60= 600hz.  But the actual refresh rate of the pixels on modern plasma panels is .001 milliseconds.  Yes, one microsecond.  LCD panels typically claim 4ms, 3ms, 6ms, etc.  [ms being millisecond].  As a result, Plasma has (and always has had) better motion than any LCD or LED regardless of the Hz rating.  As far as 60Hz vs 120Hz, since virtually nothing outputs 120Hz, and ignoring the video processing (basically upconversion) onboard the television itself, 120Hz is easier divided into by 24fps (which most film is actually recorded in) than 60Hz (some TVs like Samsung offer a 96Hz "Cinema" mode as a result of the 24fps standard).   Hence the smoother processing.  No matter what, your TV has to change the image (process it) before it is displayed on screen.  The better the processor, the better the picture.   This is why Samsung will have 8 different 40" models that differ in price by as much as $600-1000: better processing. There is not a single spec on sales tags or even the instruction manuals that will tell you how good the processor is.  You just have to look at the sets or get way in depth in tech review pages (for example, how many average consumers know what "DCDI by Faroudja" is, found in Onkyo and Denon receivers for video processing).  Just read reviews, go to CNET, and watch the TVs in person before you buy one.  Stop looking at Specs  (a good example is Contrast Ratio, which is virtually arbitrary).  Buy what looks good to you.  Then have it professionally ISF calibrated.

 

Hope that helps

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New Member
kpmedia
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-26-2009

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

Hz has started to become a numbers game, much like measuring megapixels on cameras.

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New Member
TechieFromHeck
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-12-2011

Re: 120 Hz? 600 Hz?

600Hz Plasmas are divided into 10 subfields. Each subfield refreshes at 60Hz. 10 x 60Hz = 600Hz. Marketing execs trying to impress for the wrong reasons.

Plasma pixels refresh at 1 microsecond (4000 times faster than a 4ms refresh rate LCD) and are not affected by motion blur.

It's comparing apples to oranges. Go into a store and compare the picture. That's how you figure out which TV you want.
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